Error Sorry

Frequently Asked Questions

To help new customers get started with our service, we have compiled a list of FAQs that will help explain the basics, how to setup account registration and how to configure advanced features. You can either select from the category list or use the search field below to find an answer to your question.

If you are unable to find an answer, or need additional help, please call us on: 02030263720

Search for answers to common questions

FAQs Domain Names

What are the DNS records and what do they mean?

What are the DNS records and what do they mean?

The domain name system (DNS) is essentially a system that assigns hard-to-remember IP addresses easy-to-remember names. Before DNS, computers would have to connect to each other using IP addresses, which are long strings of numbers like 127.0.0.1.

The domain name system assigns a name to this number (domain name), which makes it easier for visitors to the site to find it again.

 

When someone types in a domain name, the DNS converts into a language that a machine can understand - the IP address that was assigned to the domain name.

 

Thus the DNS allows us to type in "www.google.com" and have Google.com's homepage appear on our browsers, rather than having to type in a string of numbers. Either would work, but one is much easier for us to remember.

 

 

A Records

An A record can point a host name to an IP address. You can add multiple host records for a domain name.

  • To point just [yourdomain] to an IP address, leave the "Record Host" field blank.
  • To point [yourdomain] to an IP address enter www into the "Record Host" field.
  • To point all sub domains for [yourdomain] that do not already have a host record to an IP address enter * into the "Record Host" field.

CNAME Records

A CNAME, or canonical name record, points a hostname with no other records to another valid hostname. The canonical name you use shouldn’t have any other DNS records associated with it. CNAME’s should only be used in very few instances. For common aliases and host names use an A record instead.

A bare CNAME (ie: no “www”) will break MX records and not allow email to work. We recommend placing the CNAME on the “www” subdomain.

If you do not understand what CNAME’s are used for we do not recommend you tinker with them because the misuse of CNAME records can cause problems with the resolution of your domain name (you’ll bring your site down, and that’s no good for anyone).

MX Records

MX records are used to deliver email associated with your domain name, such as info@yourdomain.com, to the appropriate mail server, for instance, mail.yourdomain.com. If you are using your own mail server, you must do the following.

  • First, create a Host record (A Record) with the name of your mail server, most often mail.yourdomain.com or smtp.yourdomain.com, in the Host name field and the Internet Protocol (IP) address of your mail server in the IP address field.
  • Second, create an MX record with a 'Root' (@) Host name, and enter the name of your mail server again, e.g. mail.yourdomain.com or smtp.yourdomain.com, in the 'Points to' field.

TXT Records

TXT or text records can be used to enter arbitrary text strings into a DNS entry.

AAAA Records (IPV6)

An IPV6 (AAAA) record, is much like an A records, only it can point a host name to an IPV6 IP address. You can add multiple host records for a domain name.

  • To point just [yourdomain] to an IP address, leave the "Record Host" field blank.
  • To point [yourdomain] to an IP address enter www into the "Record Host" field.
  • To point all sub domains for [yourdomain] that do not already have a host record to an IP address enter * into the "Record Host" field.
Back to FAQs